Adding item to the basket

× Item added

This item has been added to your basket.

Proceed to checkout
Search the site...

Look inside
  • Publisher: Search Press
  • Edition: BC Paperback
  • Publication: 07 June 2019
  • ISBN 13/EAN: 9781782217596
  • Stock: 50+
  • Size: 155x215 mm
  • Illustrations: 120
  • Pages: 48
  • RRP Price: £4.99
Download jacket image

20 to Stitch: Fabric Buttons

£4.99

by Gina Barrett

Add to Basket
Book Description

Create 20 unique, shaped fabric buttons for use as embellishments or accessories.

Learn to make 20 button designs using fabric as an embellishment to a garment or as a piece of jewellery or accessory. Gina Barrett uses techniques such as stitching, embroidery and beading, and provides shaped templates for those projects where the reader may need more assistance.

The buttons are all worked at a small size, so will require limited materials and thread for a polished finish.

There are no complex button-making techniques here; all the buttons can be created by the reader at home, following Gina's straightforward instructions and stitch diagrams.  

Table of Contents

Introduction 4
Materials, tools and techniques 6
Flower 8
Paisley 10
Boho toggle 12
Envelope toggle 14
Dotted singleton 16
Kelly 18
Bow 20
Trinket 22
Rivet 24
Sunshine 26
Pod 28
Bottle-top 30
Garden 32
Cushion 34
Crown 36
Shell 38
Wrapped up 40
X’ Marks the Spot 42
Spiral 44
Laced up 46
Author’s note 48

About the Author

About Gina Barrett

Gina Barrett began her career as a graphic designer and illustrator, often specialising in romantic book covers. This led to more intense study of costume, which in itself led to a passion for historical passementerie including buttons and other trimmings. She now provides bespoke items to costumers for film, theatre, museums and fashion and continues to research techniques. In 2016 Gina set herself a challenge - One Button a Day, to create a passementerie button and share the image on social media every single day. The fact that it was a leap year was not one she had thought of in the January, so she did complete 366 buttons! These ranged from reconstructions of historical buttons, traditional styles, and button designs that were totally unique. She and her husband run Gina-B Silkworks, bringing original tools, kits and materials for traditional crafts to a modern audience.

Press

myshelf.com

Transform a garment, dress up cards and tags or make jewellery with this selection of twenty handmade buttons. All you need are a few button moulds and the rest is about using up a stash. Fabric, beads, fancy threads and felt are all used to create these attractive buttons. You will also require basic sewing skills and tools but this is a simple craft that can be done by most crafters. I confess to wondering where I was going to get the metal rings and wooden button blanks that are used but the author sells all these things (and more) on her website (see below). The book opens with a list of the items you will require plus some basic button techniques. Twenty To Make books have twenty projects featuring one page of what you need and instructions with the facing page showing a photograph of the item in situ. The buttons can be used wherever your imagination takes you but it is inspiring to see them worn as pendants and hair slides, dressing up cards, tags and gifts, sewn onto hats and shoes as well as being used as fastenings on garments. Instructions are in word form only; there are no staged diagrams but anybody who is au fait with the basics of sewing wont have a problem. Make toggles by rolling fabric, stitch on beads or do a bit of basic embroidery (you will need to look elsewhere for the stitches but they are simple ones) and wrap with thread. My own favourite has to be Spiral, made by rolling up bias binding over cord and adding a few beads. At the front of the book are some useful circles to trace that will fit most sizes of circular blank. Another winner in this excellent series.

Anybody who regularly reads my reviews will know I am always looking for new ways of recycling things, and here is a good one. Weave outside using yarn and twigs, cut out card circles, roll up card or hammer nails into wooden boxes or (like me) old frames. With a table fork for a beater, crochet hook and tapestry needle, hammer and nails you will probably be able to make any of the looms, all of which are so simple to make that instructions are kept to a minimum. There are plenty of clear photographic steps to stringing the looms, weaving and finishing off, and of course projects. Cover buttons, weave mats, create jewellery, wall hangings, napkin rings, wallets, bunting and more (no Alice bands). My favourites have to be the tote bag and matching clutch purse, showing that you can do a lot with a little. The threads used include all kinds of yarns but also ribbons, strips of suede and even chenilles (pipe cleaners). The projects have clear diagrams and instructions; if you are new to this sort of thing I advise starting with the simpler looms and items first. Recycling has never been so much fun!


Postcard Reviews

If you want to learn a craft simply and effortlessly then the 20 to Stitch books are just the ticket.

I have always loved buttons, I remember my mum having an old tin filled with the small colourful and sometimes strange looking necessities.

This is a book filled with exquisite buttons, these can be used to adorn jackets, bags, tags and pretty much anything that needs something to make it just right.

Easy to make, with templates and simple instructions, they are embellished with beads, embroidery and with various shapes that are quite unlike the traditional looking button.

There are 20 beautiful designs and each one has a beautiful and unique look. They do not take long to make and even if you arent a stitcher, they are still something anyone can make and still achieve a stunning result.

Add to Basket Printer friendly version

Customers who bought 20 to Stitch: Fabric Buttons, also bought...

You may also be interested in...

This site uses cookies, if you continue without changing your settings, we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies. Click here to learn how to change your cookie settings.

Continue